DEX C20™ Fat Burner Reviewed: The Indian Appetite Suppressant?

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According to the advertising literature, DEX-C20™ can help you burn additional calories, increase your energy, and decrease your appetite dramatically.

And this, all thanks to a miraculous plant from India called “Caralluma fimbriata.”

The product’s web site claims that “DEX-C20™ is backed by four (4) human clinical trials, multiple safety studies, and University reviews…” (of course they don’t happen to reference any of this “credible scientific validation” by name).

Funny thing though, when I went to PubMed to check out these studies, I wasn’t able to find anything under “DEX-C20™.”

I did, however, find one positive study on Caralluma (see Appetite. 2007 May;48(3):338-44. Epub 2006 Nov 13). It concluded…

“While there was a trend towards a greater decrease in body weight, body mass index, hip circumference, body fat and energy intake between assessment time points in the experimental group, these were not significantly different between experimental and placebo groups. Caralluma extract appears to suppress appetite, and reduce waist circumference when compared to placebo over a 2 month period.”

While positive, I would hardly describe the results of this study as a rip-roaring endorsement of Caralluma’s amazing fat burning and appetite suppressing powers.

Incidentally, it also appears to be the only published, peer-reviewed study on Caralluma’s possible benefits for dieters. I couldn’t find any of the other “human clinical trials” referenced by retailers. If these studies do exist, it is likely they are “in house” studies; studies done by the manufacturer or retailer of the product.

If there is a positive side to this, it’s that a daily dosage of DEX-C20™ contains 1 gram of Caralluma — the exact amount the participants in the study referenced above received.

DEX-C20™ also contains a blend of 10 ingredients, a…

“…breakthrough herbal blend that increases calorie burning and is stimulant-free.”

Problem is, this proprietary blend only contains 60 mg of ingredients. And that means that none of these ingredients are present in anywhere near the dosage necessary to elicit any sort of effect. It’s marketing and label decoration, pure and simple.

Originally I believed DEX-C20™ contained Citrus aurantium, a known stimulant. It does not. It actually contains Citri aurantii (orange blossom), which is not a stimulant.

The foundation of the DEX-C20™ weight loss product, therefore, is its Caralluma fimbriata content. Is this an amazing natural appetite suppressant? Will it help you to lose weight?

As of now, there is only a single, published, positive peer reviewed study for Caralluma. And single small studies can scarcely be considered “irrefutable proof” — it is not uncommon, for instance, for follow up studies to demonstrate completely contrary results.

At the same time, I have been contacted several times by Nate Bernstein, VP of Sales and Marketing of DelMar Labs, the company who makes DEX-C20™. Mr. Bernstein has indicated to me that his company has seen to undertake a large scale, double-blind clinical trial on their DEX-C20™ product , and this study will be published next year (Mr. Bernstein assures me additional positive studies will also be published on Slimaluma, the patented version of Caralluma fimbriata).

Mr. Bernstein has asked me to share the results of these studies with our visitors, and I welcome the opportunity to do so.

In the meantime, if you’re curious about Slimaluma, you can purchase it very inexpensively from BodyBuilding.com (this product also contains green tea and yerba mate, which provides it with 20 mg of caffeine).

Summary of Dex-C20
 
  • Backed by some research.
  • Relatively simple formula.
 
  • Additional herbal blend is strictly “label dressing”
  • Don’t expect miracles.
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