Review of Dermalin, Cutting & Tummy Flattening Gels and Transdermal Gel Products

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in Buyer Beware, Not Worth the Price, Patches, Creams & Gels

Dermalin and other transdermal cutting gels, as they are known, have caused quite a stir on late night television infomercials lately.

Not surprising, as they offer pretty amazing results without a whole lot of work. There are many such products, but the most popular include the aforementioned Dermalin, Cutting Gel, Tummy Flattening Gel, Remi Slimming System, Epidril, Ripping Gel, Ab Solutions, Ab-Fx, Lipo Burn… among others.

For consumers, it’s a pretty appealing thought…

Rub some magic “tummy flattening gel” on your trouble spots. Then, as you go about your day, the product goes to work on your fat deposits, magically melting them down.

Before long, you can look forward to a lean, trim body and a new career modeling swim suits.

Alas, if it were only that easy. It may not surprise you to know that there are several serious problems with “cutting gels.”

The first, and probably most disturbing issue is that there is no evidence that these products do anything at all.

None. Nien. Nyet. Nada.

That’s correct; there are no independent, peer-reviewed studies—heck, there are no studies of any kind—that show these products to be effective.

That doesn’t come just from me.

It comes from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (the U.S. regulatory body whose job it is to protect consumers from unethical retailers) who is currently taking action against the manufacturers of Dermalin, Cutting Gel, and Tummy Flattening Gel (action against other manufacturers is sure to follow, as all these products are very similar).

Here’s an excerpt from their release…

“…the FTC alleges that the respondents violated the FTC Act by making unsubstantiated fat and weight loss claims, false claims that clinical testing proves certain efficacy claims, and false claims that Daniel B. Mowrey, Ph.D, is a medical doctor.”

Read the entire FTC article here!

Basically, there’s no evidence these “tummy flattening gels” are good for anything other than transferring your hard earned cash to a big fat bank account in the Cayman Islands somewhere.

Arguably the fact that this manufacturer is fabricating clinical trial results should have you slamming your purse or wallet shut with an outraged bang.

Quality products stand on their own two feet; on a foundation of verifiable clinical data. Bogus ones do not.

I could probably end this review right here by simply saying avoid these products. However, there is one other major issue with “fat burning gels” that should be addressed.

Dermalin, Cutting Gel and others all claim to be absorbed through the skin, thereby coercing the adipose cells to release their fatty payload into the bloodstream. Here’s the thing though…

Right under the skin you have a network of zillions of capillaries. Once you rub this stuff into your skin it doesn’t just sit there and start dissolving fat, it gets diluted and transported through the body via the capillaries.

In other words, the active ingredient doesn’t act on the fat tissue at all—it simply doesn’t have time. Anyone making a contrary assertion needs to step forward with some clinical proof. The burden of proof, after all, lies with those making the claims and the money.

And there’s another issue…

Even if these gels worked releasing fat into your bloodstream won’t do you any good at all unless you happen be active enough to burn that fat as fuel. If you’re not, it would get deposited right back where it came from.

And remember… metabolizing fat as a fuel source is a much more complicated process for your body. So if you’re doing too much, your body has to provide its energy requirements from carbohydrate metabolism.

Anyway you want to slice it, these fat burning gels are a no-win situation. It probably won’t surprise you to learn that I recommend you save your money.

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