The UFB Glossary - Glossary

The UFB Glossary

6,8-Thioctic Acid

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A potent antioxidant that can increase insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal in human and animal models. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is also frequently added to creatine transport formulas as research has shown it improves creatine uptake.

ALA may have therapeutic applications.  For example, animal experiments have shown a combination of ALA and acetyl-l-carnitine can mitigate age-related mitochondrial decay. It may also be useful for treating the complications of diabetes; as well as other CNS-related diseases (i.e., Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis).

Synthetic alpha-lipoic acid is a racemic mixture consisting of two enantiomeric, “R” and “S” forms.  Only the R form is biologically significant.  Thus, better quality supplements provide this form exclusively (R-alpha-lipoic acid or K-R-alpha-lipoic acid – the potassium salt).

Alpha-lipoic acid is also known as thioctic acid or 6,8-thioctic acid.

See Paul’s article, “Alpha Lipoic Acid Reviewed: Potent Antioxidant And Blood Sugar Regulator” – as well as the Linus Pauling Institute Micronutrient Center for more information.

Thioctic Acid

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See Alpha-Lipoic Acid.

K-R-Alpha-Lipoic Acid

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The potassium salt of R-alpha-lipoic acid (R-ALA).  The salt form of R-ALA has been found to be more soluble and stable; and hence, more bioavailable than unmodified R-ALA.

R-Alpha-Lipoic Acid

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Also known as R-ALA. The biologically active form of alpha-lipoic acid.

Alpha-Lipoic Acid

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A potent antioxidant that can increase insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal in human and animal models. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is also frequently added to creatine transport formulas as research has shown it improves creatine uptake.

ALA may have therapeutic applications.  For example, animal experiments have shown a combination of ALA and acetyl-l-carnitine can mitigate age-related mitochondrial decay. It may also be useful for treating the complications of diabetes; as well as other CNS-related diseases (i.e., Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis).

Synthetic alpha-lipoic acid is a racemic mixture consisting of two enantiomeric, “R” and “S” forms.  Only the R form is biologically significant.  Thus, better quality supplements provide this form exclusively (R-alpha-lipoic acid or K-R-alpha-lipoic acid – the potassium salt).

Alpha-lipoic acid is also known as thioctic acid or 6,8-thioctic acid.

See Paul’s article, “Alpha Lipoic Acid Reviewed: Potent Antioxidant And Blood Sugar Regulator” – as well as the Linus Pauling Institute Micronutrient Center for more information.

Rubrosterone

Posted by on 9:57 am in P-T | 0 comments

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An ecdysteroid isolated from Achyranthes rubrofusca – a traditional medicinal herb.  Rubrosterone differs from other ecdysteroids used in bodybuilding supplements, as it lacks the side chain present in 20-hydroxyecdysone and its analogs.

There is virtually no accessible human or animal research on the effects of rubrosterone in isolation – thus, claims that rubrosterone is “more active” than other ecdysteroids are premature, at best. One study demonstrated Achyranthes rubrofusca extracts exerted hypolipidemic effects in rats, although what contribution – if any – made by rubrosterone is unknown.