K-O - Glossary

Momordica chirantia Extract

See Bitter...

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L-Glycine

Also known as aminoacetic acid.  Glycine is the smallest amino acid, and is non-essential.  Beyond its role as a building block for protein synthesis, glycine functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter.  There is limited evidence that suggests supplemental glycine may improve sleep quality, help stimulate growth hormone release, and treat degenerative diseases such as...

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Naringin

A flavonoid glycoside responsible for the bitter taste of grapefruit.  Naringen is metabolized to its aglycone (i.e., sugar-free) form, naringenin, in-vivo.  Both naringin and naringenin are biologically active and can contribute to the “grapefruit juice effect” on ingested drugs.  Unlike grapefruit furanocoumarins, naringin and naringenin have relatively weak effects on “Phase I” drug-metabolizing enzymes;...

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Magnolia Bark

The bark of Magnolia officinalis – which is used in Chinese traditional medicine (houpu) to treat lung and intestinal disorders.  Magnolia bark extracts contain honokiol and magnolol, which are considered to be the active ingredients.  Magnolia bark extracts have anti-depressant, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and anti-bacterial activity in animal and cell culture experiments. Standardized magnolia bark extracts are...

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Opuntia ficus-indica

Also known as “prickly pear”.  A domesticated cactus used for food as well as medicinal purposes.  Opuntia is traditionally used as a hangover cure, and has antioxidant, hepatoprotective and gastroprotective effects.  Opuntia pads (nopales) contain fiber/mucilages that improve glycemic control and blood lipids. “In-house” studies by Bio Serae, manufacturers of a commercial extract, Neopuntia, indicate it may be...

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Lycopene

A carotenoid found in tomato products, as well as other fruits (pink grapefruit and watermelon) with antioxidant activity.  Unlike certain other carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, lycopene has no pro-vitamin A activity.  Epidemiological studies have linked consumption of lycopene-containing foods to a reduced risk of prostate and other cancers, although it’s difficult to say whether the benefits are solely due to lycopene, or a...

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